Category Archives: Centenary

Centenary Celebrations in Korea

This article describes the centenary exhibition in Korea:

Celebrating 100 Years of Anne of Green Gables

Anne Shirley of Green Gables is 100 years old this year. Her story, by Canadian writer Lucy Maud Montgomery (1874-1942), was first published in 1908. The National Library for Children and Young Adults and the Canadian Embassy in Korea are holding a special exhibition celebrating Anne’s 100th anniversary.

The exhibition will include 35 handcrafted works, like Anne of Green Gables-themed dolls and dollhouses, art and pop-up books. Some 25 photographs of the Prince Edward Island landscape, Anne’s nominal home, a giant map of Canada, and other information on Canada will be featured. For further information, call (02) 3413-4757.

Anne of 100 Candles

An article by Meghan O’Rourke, titled “Anne of 100 Candles,” appeared yesterday on the website for Slate Magazine. Here’s an extract:

Her temper and her gaffes provide fodder for those village members who dislike having a child of “uncertain parentage” around. Yet with time, Anne wins nearly everyone over, as her grace, curiosity, and haplessness catalyze the bloodless community. She enables adults to reconnect with the childish soul within.

Thanks to Carole Gerson, Michelle Levy, and Lisa Lightbourn-Lay for bringing this article to my attention.

Anne of Green Gables Contest Winners Varied

Anne of Green Gables contest winners varied

A young Muslim woman originally from Saudi Arabia and a farmer from Ontario are among the winners of a national letter-writing contest in celebration of the 100th Anniversary of Anne of Green Gables announced by Penguin Group Canada.

The letters by Sarah Khan of Mississauga, Ont. and Bill H. Wiebe of London, Ont., co-winners in the 18 and over category, were described by judges as “staggering,” “brave” “powerful” and “eloquent.”

Khan found a copy of the novel in a pile of trash left by American soldiers after the first Gulf War and instantly connected with L.M. Montgomerys heroine, while Wiebe identified with Anne even though she is female.

OTHER WINNERS INCLUDE:
– Age 8-10: Rebecca Brooks, Winnipeg, Man.
– Age 11-13: Traleena Rouleau, Ottawa.
– Age 15-17: Hannah Tufts, Winnipeg, Man.

Among the prizes each of the five winners will receive is a $2,500 travel voucher to visit Prince Edward Island.

Anne-Mania Goes Global

Anne-mania goes global; Canada’s most famous literary export is being feted around the world

The Japanese, on the other hand, emphasize Annes almost mystical worship of nature and Montgomerys lyrical descriptions of the Island because those aspects of the novel tie in with Shinto—the native religion of Japan, which includes a belief in spirits associated with a particular place.

There are other reasons Anne appeals to Japanese fans.
The Japanese translation was published in 1952, when the horrors of the Second World War were still fresh and there were many orphans.

Anne also provides a complex model of femininity that resonates for Japanese women, according to Irene Gammel, author of Looking for Anne: How Lucy Maud Montgomery Dreamed Up a Literary Classic. “Anne is tempestuous, she has outbursts. Yet at the same time she is a good girl.”

Constrained by traditional gender roles, Anne’s mostly female Japanese fans appreciate the way Montgomery’s heroine “negotiates with people living in a narrow minded community which reminds them of their own society,” notes Japanese-born, Toronto-based Yuka Kajihara, a founding member of the L.M. Montgomery Research Group.

Centenary Events in Japan

The following information is provided to us by Yuka Kajihara, who invites interested persons to contact her directly.

Whether you are aware or not, there are numerous of Anne-related events happening in Japan! Recently I was asked to provide a resource on this matter by a journalist from Canwest News Service and I made a brief list of it:

  • The exhibition entitled “Hanako Muraoka and Akage no An” is held at International Institute for Children’s Literature in Osaka, Japan between May and July. Because the first translators of Anne of Green Gables is Hanako Muraoka, there is no way to talk about Anne without her.
  • The nationwide exhibition entitled “Anne of Green Gables: L.M. Montgomery’s beloved PEI” starts in June until next June 2009. The display includes Magog (from Robert Montgomery), a few pages of manuscript from AoGG, LMM’s crazy quilt and more.
  • Embassy of Canada in Tokyo supports some of the events on “Anne”, such as Gekidan Shiki’s musical Anne of Green Gables:
  • Hanako Muraoka’s biography Anne’s Cradle written by her grand-daughter Eri Muraoka is published in June 2008. The cover image shows Anne & Green Gables: http://item.rakuten.co.jp/book/5683488/. Nowadays, the name of Hanako Muraoka (poet, translator, Children’s writer, radio personality) is popular only because of her translation of the Anne series.
  • In celebrating 100th anniversary of Anne, newly revised edition of Akage no An (translated by Hanako Muraoka, revised by Mie Muraoka who is another grand-daughter of Hanako’s) is published by Shinchosha, Tokyo. In this edition, Mie added the portions that Hanako had omitted to translate in some unknown reasons.
  • Budge Wilson’s Before Green Gables is translated/published by Shinchosha in June. The Japanese title is Hello Anne.
  • Nippon Hoso Kyokai (NHK) broadcast a special program “Welcome to the Anne’s World” in January. This one show was rebroadcast 2 more times due to popular demand. It includes a letter by Luella and some photographs of Luella with the letter that Jason took. You can see the pictures, and as well as pictures of Luella’s. One is of lover’s lane given to her by LMM and the other is a picture of Luella as a baby being held by LMM. See http://www.flickr.com/photos/complicitytheory/sets/72157603293739689/. Some of you might find it funny that we actually took these photos in a sushi bar in Yorkville. Luella’s favourite place.
  • NHK also broadcast a tree-month long (from April to June) English conversation program “The journey to Akage no An.” I heard that the textbook of this program has sold more than 130,000 copies so far. That figure is incredible! Anne is not only a gateway to learn PEI but also to learn English to Japanese audience. The staff visited PEI last Summer. Here is an article about them in the Guardian: http://www.theguardian.pe.ca/index.cfm?sid=48277&sc=98 (“Japanese film crew tapes Anne program on P.E.I.”).
  • There are many other Anne-related things happening in Japan: smaller production size of musicals, another exhibitions of Anne and many other publications. A scholarly book on Anne to which I contributed will be published soon. A short biography of L.M. Montgomery for Juvenile readers by Miki Okuda was published in March. And the Nippon Animation Co., LTD sells a boxed set of DVD entitled, “Akage no An: the DVD Memorial Box.”
  • As you probably already know, the first translator of AOGG into Japanese is Hanako Muraoka (1893-1968). Muraoka once worked for a publisher Kyobunkan in Tokyo which was originally established by Methodist missionaries from the USA, in 1885. This is the place Muraoka first met Canadian missionary Miss Loretta L. Shaw. In 1939, before leaving Japan due to the WWII, Shaw gave a copy of Anne of Green Gables to Muraoka as a keepsake. Kyobunkan is now having special events in order to celebrate Hanako’s work & Anne’s 100th anniversary.
  • June 21 – July 16. “Akage no An This exhibition is focusing on Muraoka’s work and displays books translated by her, including L.M. Montgomery, Louisa May Alcott, Eleanor Porter and more. Along with these books, photographs of PEI taken by well known photographer Kazutoshi Yoshimura are displayed. and the work of Hanako Muraoka” at Nalnia Hall, Kyobunkan, in Tokyo.
  • June 29. 2-3 p.m. Eri Muraoka Gallery Talk at Narnia Hall, Kyobunkan. Eri is Hanako’s grand-daughter who recently published a biography of Hanako. Her talk is entitled (loosely translated) “The very first Akage no An: a promise to Miss Shaw, editor of Kyobunkan.”

Further Chronicles of My Inbox

I’ve received e-mail notifications of the following exhibit, conference, and play series:

From Irene Gammel: A notification that the “Reflecting on Anne of Green Gables” exhibit, co-curated by June Creelman and Irene Gammel, opened on 4 June 2008 at Library and Archives Canada (395 Wellington St., Ottawa) and will be available until 1 March 2009. More details are available on LAC’s webpage devoted to the exhibit and in a Reuters article covering the exhibit.

From Eric Bungay: The preliminary program for “From Canada to the World: The Cultural Influence of Lucy Maud Montgomery,” which will take place in October 2008 at the University of Guelph, has been posted. Registration information should be made available within ten days.

From Sally Cole: The L.M. Montgomery Theatre has opened up in Cavendish, PE, for a series of shows staged in a former church where Montgomery worshiped, part of the Avonlea Village outside the outskirts of the town. The theatre is staging plays popular in the year Anne of Green Gables was published, with The Wind in the Willows scheduled to open the season. An article has been published in today’s Guardian.

Alumni & Friends – Get Involved | University of Guelph

Just found this upcoming event for anyone in the Guelph area…
Alumni & Friends – Get Involved | University of Guelph

Wednesday, May 21, 2008:  AIA Annual Spring Luncheon
Join the Alumni-In-Action at their Spring Luncheon in the Arboretum.  This annual event starts at 11:30 a.m. with a reception with lunch served at 12 noon.  At 12:45 pm, Professor Mary Rubio, editor of the LM Montgomery Collection at the University of Guelph will speak on the topic entitled “Anne in the Archives.”  2008 marks the 100th anniversary of the publications of Lucy Maud Montgomerys novel “Anne of Green Gables,” and we have great reason to celebrate at the University of Guelph.  The McLaughlin Library is home to the largest archival collection of LM Montgomery personal archival material in the world.  Tickets are $20 per person.  Registration can be done online, by email, by calling 519 824-4120 ext. 56934 or by mail:  Alumni House, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1.  Please note that the entrance to the Arboretum is now off College Avenue.

Chronicles of My Inbox

Today I received notices of three separate L.M. Montgomery events and exhibits and a video.

From Mary Beth Cavert (Minnesota): A link to a page devoted to details and photos of the L.M. Montgomery Literary Society’s first Anne event;

From Rita Bode (Trent University): A notice that Robarts Library of the University of Toronto has launched its own exhibit titled “Picture of Green Gables Farm,” which runs from 21 April to 21 May 2008 on the first floor of the Robarts Library. Commemorating the 100th anniversary of the publication of Anne of Green Gables, the collection includes a number of editions, translations, adaptations, other books by the author, and items related to Prince Edward Island.

From Helen Salmon (University of Guelph library): Between 23 and 26 October 2008, the University of Guelph will host “The Cultural Influence of Lucy Maud Montgomery,” a symposium that will focus on Guelph’s extensive archival collection of Montgomery materials:

The university has undertaken an extensive digitization project to make its extensive collection of Montgomery memorabilia — including her private journals, scrapbooks, handiwork, photographs, and other records – more accessible to Montgomery scholars and fans everywhere. The symposium will offer the very first opportunity to explore the newly launched collections website, examine the archival collections first-hand, view an L.M. Montgomery exhibit at the University’s art gallery, and listen to speakers who will explore her impact on readers, writers, and women in the 20th century. Join with Canada’s foremost Montgomery scholars, biographers, enthusiasts, and fans to recognize her world-wide legacy and explore the mystery of her creativity. This four day weekend event will include coach tours to view several of  L.M. Montgomery’s residences in Ontario, the opening of an art exhibit,  film viewings, panel discussions, and scholarly presentations which will highlight author’s contributions to literary and popular culture.

The Ryerson Showcase

On Monday, the three of us attended A Ryerson Showcase: The Centenary of Anne of Green Gables / A Symposium/Exhibit Organized by the Students in ACS 800 at Ryerson University. Irene Gammel’s 4th-year students did a fantastic job organizing every aspect of the event, and it was a real treat to hear their presentations as well. Two students recreated the brown gloria dress that Mrs. Lynde makes for Anne, and it’s only once you see how intricate it’s made that you realize the sheer amount of work this would have meant for Mrs. Lynde (supposing, of course, that she was an actual person). I don’t have a photo of it, but it will be on display in the Modern Literature and Culture Centre at Ryerson.

Speakers included Irene Gammel, Ann F. Howey, Helen Hoy, Elizabeth MacLeod, Leslie McGrath, Margaret Steffler, Judy Stoffman, Hildi Froese Tiessen, Paul Tiessen, and the three of us. I very much enjoyed the opportunity to reunite with several long-time friends and colleagues, so overall the day was quite enjoyable.

UPDATE: Jason has posted a number of photos of the event, which can be found here.