The Selected Journals of L.M. Montgomery, Volume 2: 1910–1921

Editors: Mary Rubio and Elizabeth Waterston
Paratexts: Introduction and Notes by Mary Rubio and Elizabeth Waterston
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Date: 1987
Pagination: xx + 443 pp.
Format: Jacketed hardcover
Trim: 6” x 9”
ISBN: 0-19-5405862

The Selected Journals of L.M. Montgomery, Volume 2: 1910–1921, edited and introduced by Mary Rubio and Elizabeth Waterston, offers a selection of Montgomery’s journals written from the ages of thirty-five to forty-six. It was preceded by Volume 1: 1889–1910 (1985) and followed by Volume 3: 1921–1929 (1992), Volume 4: 1929–1935 (1998), and Volume 5: 1935–1942 (2004). It was published as a jacketed hardcover by Oxford University Press in October 1987, with a trade paperback appearing in April 2003. Part of the text of this volume was revisited in L.M. Montgomery’s Complete Journals: The Ontario Years, 1911–1917 (2016), edited by Jen Rubio.

From the Dust Jacket

Since the publication—to great critical acclaim—of Volume I of Lucy Maud Montgomery’s journals, this second volume covering the period 1910 to 1921 has been eagerly awaited. Volume II records a time of great change and upheaval both in Montgomery’s life and in society. When she wrote the first entry in this volume she had recently become a world-famous author, having published Anne of Green Gables in 1908. Here we become privy to her response to the death of her grandmother, who had restricted her life severely; her marriage and honeymoon trip to Scotland and England; and her departure from Prince Edward Island to the new restrictions of her life as the wife of a Presbyterian minister in an Ontario village. Montgomery reveals the intensities of friendship, the minutiae of home-making, the joys of motherhood along with the traumas of a disturbed marriage, and records the sources and composition of the “Anne” series and the emergence of her new heroine “Emily.” Besides learning about the rewards and trials—including two unpleasant lawsuits—of being a successful author, we see also how a sensitive woman responded to the possibility, the actuality, and the aftermath of a world war.

By turns tart and sentimental, sharp-sighted and anxiety-ridden, L.M. Montgomery provides a compelling record of her remarkable life against the background—both social and literary—of a tumultuous period in Canadian history. The entries in this volume more than fulfil the promise of Volume I.

Contents

Illustrations (vi–vii)

Acknowledgements (viii)

Introduction / Mary Rubio and Elizabeth Waterston (ix–xx)

1910 (1–35)

1911 (36–51)

1912 (52–116)

1913 (117–40)

1914 (141–58)

1915 (159–74)

1916 (175–200)

1917 (201–37)

1918 (238–79)

1919 (280–362)

1920 (363–94)

1921 (395–405)

Notes (406–34)

Omissions (435)

A Note on Dates (435)

Index (436–43)

Reviews

Reviews by Ken Adachi, Heather Avery, Laurel Boone, J.M. Bumsted, Frances Carruthers, Elizabeth R. Epperly, V. Gillham, Alison Gzowski, Janice Kulyk Keefer, Eileen Manion, Lucie A. Milne, Patricia Morley, Marilyn Powell, Margaret J. Ritchie, Nancy A. Schiefer, Joan Thomas, Henry Wiebe, and Lorraine M. York.