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Emily of New Moon: Textual Variants

What follows is a line-by-line comparison between the original edition of Emily of New Moon, published in 1923, and the Bantam-Seal paperback edition, published in 1983 and reissued in 1992 and 1998.

All chapter numbers change from “Chapter I,” “Chapter II,” etc., to “1,” “2,” etc.

1: The House in the Hollow } { 2: A Watch in the Night } { 3: A Hop out of Kin } { 4: A Family Conclave } { 5: Diamond Cut Diamond } { 6: New Moon } { 7: The Book of Yesterday } { 8: Trial by Fire } { 9: A Special Providence } { 10: Growing Pains } { 11: Ilse } { 12: The Tansy Patch } { 13: A Daughter of Eve } { 14: Fancy Fed } { 15: Various Tragedies } { 16: Check for Miss Brownell } { 17: Living Epistles } { 18: Father Cassidy } { 19: Friends Again } { 20: By Aerial Post } { 21: “Romantic but not Comfortable” } { 22: Wyther Grange } { 23: Deals with Ghosts } { 24: A Different Kind of Happiness } { 25: “She Couldn’t Have Done It” } { 26: On the Bay Shore } { 27: The Vow of Emily } { 28: A Weaver of Dreams } { 29: Sacrilege } { 30: When the Curtain Lifted } { 31: Emily’s Great Moment }

1: The House in the Hollow

sitting-room [2, end of line] / sittingroom [1]

liked Christiana’s adventures half as well as Christian’s. [3] / liked Christiana’s adventures half as well as Christian’s. [3]

delicious horror of it! [3] / delicious horror if [sic] it! [3]

2: A Watch in the Night

There are no changes found in this chapter.

3: A Hop out of Kin

an army with banners,” [24] / an army with banner,” [23]

ill-bred child,” she said; “but of course [27] / ill-bred child,” she said; “But of course [26]

her long, thin mouth [28] / her long thin mouth [27]

moon-faced [30, end of line] / moonfaced [29]

4: A Family Conclave

disturbance of drapery, and then [37] / disturbance of drapery and then [36]

I do youryour—” [41] / I do your—your—” [39]

to fit Uncle Wallace; and what exquisite [43] / to fit Uncle Wallace and what exquisite [42]

5: Diamond Cut Diamond

his peculiar quality of grimness. [44] / his peculiar quality of grim-ness. [42]

with an air of relief. [45] / with an air or relief. [43]

apple and lilac blossom—sometimes [50] / apple and lilac blossom— sometimes [48]

6: New Moon

only one is patched.——” [53] / only one is patched—” [51]

The woods are full of ’em,” [54] / The woods are full of em,” [52]

I guess I’m Father-sick, [60, hyphen at end of line] / I guess I’m Fathersick, [58]

at the window—she heard [62] / at the window— she heard [60]

7: The Book of Yesterday

seen a sun-dial before [71, hyphen at end of line] / seen a sundial before [69]

I’ll tell it to-morrow [72] / I’ll tell it tomorrow [69]

I’ll tell you all about us to-morrow.” [72] / I’ll tell you all about us tomorrow.” [70]

one thing worries me Cousin Jimmy, do you think [76] one thing worries me, Cousin Jimmy, do you think [73]

such a fool as that.” [77] / such a fool as that” [74]

8: Trial by Fire

teasing Emily Starr to-morrow [86, hyphen at end of line] / teasing Emily Starr tomorrow [82–83]

a fringed top-buggy [86] / a fringed-top buggy [83]

a fat, jolly-looking old man [90–91, hyphen at end of line] / a fat, jollylooking old man [87]

9: A Special Providence

I am so exited [sic]. [99] / I am so excited. [95]

I have always suspekted my eyes [101] / I have always suspected my eyes [97]

one good-looking person [101, hyphen at end of line] / one goodlooking person [98]

the garret and the cook-house [101, hyphen at end of line] / the garret and the cookhouse [98]

Now Autumn comes . . . fluttering falls dead. [102] / Now Autumn comes . . . fluttering falls dead. [98]

10: Growing Pains

gilt-edged note-paper [105–6, second hyphen at end of line] / gilt-edged notepaper [102]

flower-wreathed leg-horn hat [106, second hyphen at end of line] / flower-wreathed leghorn hat [102]

“Buttercup, flower of . . . down within the vale.” [112] / “Buttercup, flower of . . . down within the vale.” [108]

“You cast your loveliness . . . dear to me.” [113] / “You cast your loveliness . . . dear to me.” [108]

11: Ilse

a large connection of dead Murrays. [114] / a large collection of dead Murrays. [110]

ike [sic] a huge grey cat [117 ] / like a huge grey cat [113]

the menacing thunder-heads. [117, hyphen at end of line] / the menacing thunderheads. [113]

12: The Tansy Patch

to the playhouse next morning, [124] / to the play house next morning, [119]

By the sick-bed [125, hyphen at end of line] / By the sickbed [121]

a tumble-down little barn, [127, hyphen at end of line] / a tumbledown little barn, [122]

Sweet little flower . . . my flower of blue. [134] / Sweet little flower . . . my flower of blue. [129]

Is it impropper to talk about haveing grandchildren. I have discovered that it is impropper to talk about haveing children. [136] / Is it improper to talk about having children. I have discovered that it is impropper to talk about haveing children. [131]

13: A Daughter of Eve

the only valuble possession I have. [142] / the only valuable possession I have. [137]

in bed; but an hour later [145] / in bed, but an hour later [140]

14: Fancy Fed

There are no textual variants in this chapter.

15: Various Tragedies

the big sand-dunes [154; end of line] / the big sanddunes [149]

Along the snow . . . fair and bright. [161] / Along the snow . . . fair and bright. [156]

Dripping with dimonds, [161] / Dripping with diamonds, [156]

Mike has made . . . across the snow. [161] / Mike has made . . . across the snow. [156]

such a ridik-lus thing. [163, end of line] / such a ridikulus thing. [157]

the cook-house roof [165, hyphen at end of line] / the cookhouse roof [159]

“Emily. [165] / “Emily. ¶ *     *     * [159]

16: Check for Miss Brownell

look—exactly—like fractions. [167] / look—excactly—like fractions. [162]

“‘Lilies lifted up . . . the bees to dr—r—i—i—nk.’” [171] / “Lilies lifted up . . . the bees to dr—r—i—i—nk.’” [165]

Poem on Mr. Tom Bennet’s Field’ [171] / ‘Poem on Mr. Tom Bennet’s Field’ [165]

“‘Crusted with uncounted . . . cold and true,’ [171] / “‘Crusted with uncounted . . . cold and true,’ [165]

behaviour in school to-day,” [174; hyphen at end of line] / behaviour in school today,” [168]

in a different tone, “I was wrong— [177] / in a different tone,” I was wrong— [171]

the delicious sausages [178] / the delicious suasages [172]

Come back to . . . to the grave. [179] / Come back to . . . to the grave. [173]

17: Living Epistles

Im not afraid to either. [181] / I’m not afraid to either. [175]

paying me a compelment. [183] / paying me a complement. [176] (“compelmentary” 190 not corrected)

unexpekted company came [183] / unexpected company came [177]

Steal not this book . . . go down below. [185] / Steal not this book . . . go down below. [178]

“May 20. [185; small caps] / “May 20. [179]

“Dear Father: [188; small caps] / “Dear Father: [181]

she just didnt like me. [189] / she just didn’t like me. [182]

Dear Father: [191; small caps] / “Dear Father: [184]

Bustles are very fashunable now [192] / Bustles are very fashionable now [186]

18: Father Cassidy

since their school-days [196, end of line] / since their schooldays [189]

can’t do their own swearing. [202] / can’t do their own swaring. [194]

not as priest to parishoner, [203–4] / not as priest to parishioner [196]

a pig’s whisper—“there’s something odd [205] / a pig’s whisper— “there’s something odd [197]

19: Friends Again

“Will ye take a lift, [211] / “Will ya take a lift, [204]

Father Cassidy to be writing to you— [213] / Father Cassidy to be writing you— [206]

“P. S. The B’y sends respects. [214] / “P.S. The B’y sends respects. [207]

20: By Aerial Post

“Dearest Father: [small caps] [216; small caps] / “Dearest Father: [208]

“Dear Father: [217; small caps] / “Dear Father: [209]

“Poor Elder MacKay has the mumps. [220] / “Poor Elder McKay has the mumps. [212]

The other day in history class [220] / “The other day in history class [212]

I wish Dr. Burnley would love Ilse. [222] / I wish Dr. Burnley would love Isle. [214]

“Dear Father: ¶ Christmas is over. [222; “Dear Father” in small caps] “Dear Father: ¶ Christmas is over. [214]

21: “Romantic but not Comfortable”

“Boots be —” [227] / “Boots be—” [219]

let me finish it.” [232] / let me finish it. [224]

“P. S. I am not [235] / “P.S. I am not [226]

“P. S. No. 2.” [235] / “P.S. No. 2.” [226]

22: Wyther Grange

over in the cook-house, [239, hyphen at end of line] / over in the cookhouse [230]

Emily was as brave as a lion in daylight. [242] / Emily was brave as a lion in daylight. [233]

a thin, claw-like hand [246, hyphen at end of line] / a thin, clawlike hand [238]

23: Deals with Ghosts

YOUR aunt is in the back parlor,” said Caroline Priest. “Come [247] / “Your aunt is in the back parlor,” said Caroline Priest, “Come [238]

a flight of four steps led up to a door. [247] / a flight of steps led up to a door. [239]

24: A Different Kind of Happiness

“Dear Father: [257; small caps] / “Dear Father: [248]

a sand-glass for boiling eggs [259; hyphen at end of line] / a sandglass for boiling eggs [250]

a letter from Ilse to-day. [261; hyphen at end of line] / a letter from Ilse today. [252]

“P. S. I am afraid [262] / “P.S. I am afraid [253]

25: “She Couldn’t Have Done It”

Allan Burnley was always stubborn [266] / Allen Burnley was always stubborn [256]

an unjust old hag—that she didn’t flirt [266] / an unjust old hag— that she didn’t flirt [257]

when Allan was away seeing his patients. [267] / when Allan was always seeing his patients. [258]

Everybody knows what kind of a man [268] / Everybody knows what kind of man [258]

facts to the contrary nothwithstanding, [270] / facts to the contrary notwithstanding, [260]

26: On the Bay Shore

I WONDER,” thought Emily, [270] / “I wonder,” thought Emily, [261]

I sit by . . . on Malvern Bay—” [279] / I sit by . . . on Malvern Bay—” [269]

Perhaps in those . . . the proud bay’s breast— [279] / Perhaps in those . . . the proud bay’s breast— [269]

in the afternoons, and I hate buttoned boots. [280] / in the afternoons and I hate buttoned boots. [270]

something beyond the ordinary. One pays for it in bondage of some kind or other. Take your wonderful aster home [281] / something beyond the ordinary. Take your wonderful aster home [271]

27: The Vow of Emily

They had mothers, sisters and sweethearts. [284] / They had mothers, sisters, and sweethearts. [274]

The heroes of Thermopylæ [284] / The heroes of Thermopylae [274]

hanging about, barefooted and sun-burned, [289, hyphen at end of line] / hanging about, barefooted and sunburned, [279]

a steady up-right flame [292, hyphen at end of line] / a steady upright flame [292]

Then whisper, blossom, . . . woman’s humble name. [300–301] / Then whisper, blossom, . . . woman’s humble name. [290]

“P. S. I have been wondering [301] / “P.S. I have been wondering [291]

28: A Weaver of Dreams

you did not forget the year it happened; [304] / you did not forget the year it all happened; [292]

school-teachers knew their place better [310, hyphen at end of line] / schoolteachers knew their place better [299]

thrilling in the darkness, and picture [312] / thrilling in the darkness and picture [301]

The haunting elfin music of the air. [313] / The haunting elfin music of the air. [302]

29: Sacrilege

“I’ll send you away from New Moon,” [317] / “I’ll sent you away from New Moon,” [306]

a large bundle of letters by now [319] / a great bundle of letters by now [308]

because she had hurt Aunt Elizabeth [323] / because she had hurt Elizabeth [312]

as if closing the door on the whole incident, [325] / as if closing the door on the whole incident. [314]

30: When the Curtain Lifted

that summer in body, mind and soul. [326] / that summer in body, mind, and soul. [315]

transferred as best she could to paper, [326] / transferred as best as she could to paper, [315]

“Never on painter’s . . . his fancy’s dream.” [327] / “Never on painter’s . . . his fancy’s dream.” [315]

“Jimmy Joe Belle’s two children [329] / “Jimmy Joe Bell’s two children [318]

we need be alarmed yet. [331] / we need to be alarmed yet. [319]

until the grey dawn [333] / until the gray dawn [321]

31: Emily’s Great Moment

and by September, when . . . Dean Priest had gone on one of his sudden swoops over to Europe for the autumn, [341] / and by December, when . . . Dean Priest had gone on one of his sudden swoops over to Europe for the autumn, [329]

Aim and Endeavour [345] / “Aim and Endeavor [333]

a month you’ve missed? —‘Windy meadows [346] / a month you’ve missed?—‘Windy meadows [334]

Thirty years from now I will have a claim [350] / Thirteen years from now I will have a claim [338]

[All indented poetry extracts are in roman type in the 1923 edition, italicized in the Seal edition]