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Sir Walter Scott

1771–1832. Scottish poet and novelist.

At a Glance

Rilla of Ingleside (1)

Summary

The Lady of the Lake (2)
Marmion: A Tale of Flodden Field (1)

The Lady of the Lake (1810 narrative poem)

Sooth was my prophecy of fear;
Believe it when it augurs cheer.
(Canto 4, stanza 11, lines 13–14)

Rilla of Ingleside, chapter 30 (“Sooth was my prophecy of fear / Believe it when it augurs cheer”).

If eve return him not again,
Am I to hie and make me known?
Alas! he goes to Scotland’s throne,
Buys his friends’ safety with his own;
He goes to do – what I had done,
Had Douglas’ daughter been his son!
’ (Canto 4, stanza 10, lines 26–31

Rilla of Ingleside, chapter 5 (“He goes to do what I had done / Had Douglas’ daughter been his son”).

Marmion: A Tale of Flodden Field (1808 narrative poem)

Now, men of death, work forth your will,
For I can suffer, and be still;
And come he slow, or come he fast,
It is but Death who comes at last.
(Canto 2, stanza 30, lines 9–12)

Rilla of Ingleside, chapter 14 (“Comes he slow or comes he fast / It is but death who comes at last”).

Source

Scott, Sir Walter. The Complete Poetical Works of Sir Walter Scott: Cambridge Edition. Boston and New York: Houghton Mifflin Company; Cambridge: The Riverside Press, 1900. Online at https://archive.org/details/completepoetical00scot/page/n7/mode/2up